The Next Big Things at the Wearable Technology Show

31 March 2016
By Roman Chernyshev, Senior VP, Healthcare and Life Sciences Practice, DataArt and Janie Fox, Account Director, Travel and Hospitality Practice, DataArt

The Third Annual Wearable Technology Show was held at London’s ExCel conference center on 15th-16th of March. There were over 140 exhibitors, nine tracks and more than 40 product launches to keep technology executives on their toes.

Healthcare & Life Science, Travel & Hospitality and Betting & iGambling Practices of DataArt exhibited at the event and demoed many of our concept products, examples of how technology brings business value. Here are some of them: KidPRO uses gamification to motivate and engage young patients while managing their own healthcare or participating in a clinical trial. MedAR is an augmented reality app that recognizes medications and provides all relevant information about it. Pills Adjutant simplifies medication adherence. Tiredness Checker helps users check their tiredness level. SmartBet and WatchSlots apps bring quick bets and slots to your wrist.

It seems that smart wearables are at the peak of the hype cycle. CCS Insight has published a forecast on the future of wearable technology. The market has skyrocketed over the past several years, promising to attach 123 million devices (worth $14 billion) to our bodies in 2016, while 411 million smart wearable devices, worth $34.2 billion, will be sold in 2020.

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Starship’s CMO Julian Price talked about how Virtual Reality (VR) can turn social networks into sociable networks. The key, he said, will be the transition from phone, tablet or computer-based interactions, into real-time, VR interactions. Facebook’s 2 billion investment in the Oculus Rift headset is another statement towards the trend. vTime demoed at the show is the first VR social network which lets you meet, interact and chat to anyone with a smartphone and a VR headset.

Another interesting product was a VR surgical training tool, designed to teach surgical procedures to medical students. The teaching surgeon wears a headset during the surgery and somewhere, possibly on the other side of the world, students are watching the surgery in real time. You can also simulate the procedure and various complications that might arise. It suddenly becomes quite imaginable to study geography, biology or history in a VR headset.

Wearable Awards 2016 that took place on the main stage were another highlight. Here are some of the winners:

MYZONE was named the Overall Wearable Winner. It is a comprehensive exercise tracker that gives you access to a personal cloud-based activity page where you can view your daily, weekly and yearly fitness results, track food, enter group challenges and more. Octagon won the best app and a rising star award. They demoed 4D + Augmented Reality (AR) flash cards and a mobile app, making education more fun by having 3D images come alive and become interactive.

Best Consumer Product award was won by Clara Swiss Tech with Clara smart jacket that incorporates ultra bright turn signals and braking sensors to improve cyclists’ and pedestrians' safety. IOT Connect Winner was NCube a smart home solution, that allows one to integrate all different smart home devices together. Healthcare Innovation and Business Start-Up Award winner was Walk with Path, a company that develops products that improve mobility and prevent falls in patients who experience difficulties related to balance.

After a mind boggling variety of medical tech, sports tech and kid tech, there was more to come – namely pet tech and hard to believe, but… unborn baby tech. Pet bit developed collars that measure your dog’s activity, with the app that provides guidelines to help the owner understand how much exercise the dog needs, based on its age, weight and breed. Babytech came in the form of a Babypod, a wearable tech for your unborn baby, in the form of a musical device designed for pregnancy. Way to go, wearable tech!

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